Upcoming Conference: Sustainable Development Policy Institute, Pakistan

I will soon be leaving for Pakistan to present a paper at the thirteenth annual conference of the SDPI. I will be blogging about the conference while there, but those of you interested in the conference would probably benefit from the information provided below.

Concept Note

The Sustainable Development Policy Institute (SDPI) is holding its Thirteenth Sustainable Development Conference (SDC) from 21-23 December 2010 in Islamabad, Pakistan. This year’s Conference is titled ‘“Peace and Sustainable Development in South Asia: The Way Forward”. Each SDC is designed as a forum for sharing and exchanging dialogue on sustainable development with academia, practitioners, civil society, legislators and policy-makers. The SDC series has been established as a prime Conference in South Asia on development issues attracting leading intellectuals, development practitioners, communities and policy-makers working in or on South Asian issues.

Some 100 delegates from 12 countries participated in the Twelfth Sustainable Development Conference held in December 2009. In the 23 panels spread over three days, an audience of about a 1,200 came to listen to the speakers from Bangladesh, Canada, China, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Turkey, Germany, US, Canada and the UK. The Twelfth SDC was widely praised for providing an important platform for discussions on a wide range of topics around sustainable development, as well as for bringing together academics from a region characterized by disunity and poor regional relations. The conference also received extensive coverage both in print and electronic media within and outside Pakistan.

An anthology (a critical outcome of each conference), based on peer-reviewed papers, titled Peace and Sustainable Development in South Asia: Issues and Challenges of Globalization jointly published by SDPI and Sang-e-Meel was launched at the inaugural of the Twelfth SDC. The next anthology titled Fostering Sustainable Development in South Asia: Responding to Challenges is presently in the publication process.

Major Themes

The three-day Conference shall have panels that will be open to questions on key concerns in the present scenario of social insecurity in South Asia. Another major focus of this Conference will be on post-flood Pakistan. Some panels will specifically deal with issues related to flood preparedness and impact of climate change. Previous conferences provided fertile ground for debate on issues of security, climate change, energy, environmental issues, peace, conflict, education, health, the financial crisis and women empowerment among others. The Twelfth SDC discussed the six Fs crises (food, fuel, fiscal, frontiers, functional democracy, and fragility of climate) facing South Asia in detail. The forthcoming SDC will use that information as a platform, a learning ground, for further discussion on the relation between 6Fs crises vis-à-vis four levels of security, i.e., global, regional, state, and individual securities. The discussions will focus on the importance of individual security through social sector development for a secure state, region, and globe and for sustained peace.

Peace and security will be central to the discussions this year and views will be exchanged on how they can be ensured with the premise that until the basic needs of the people are met, the rest of the issues such as that of conflict in the region cannot possibly be dealt with or improved. Tied in with this there will be deliberations on how economic challenges can be handled with positive results in terms of using natural resources effectively while at the same time increasing the capacity and effectiveness of institutions. The panels will cover themes such as post-flood situation in Pakistan, food insecurity, energy crisis, financial crisis, the issue of land acquisition, trade and financial liberalization, social protection, the eradication of Violence Against Women (VAW) and beyond millennium development goals vis-à-vis militancy and conflict.

The Conference will, however, not be limited to these queries alone but will also be addressing issues of wider interest to the audience, policy makers, civil society and other stakeholders as the panel titles suggest.

Conference Format For The SDC 2010

There will be one main plenary each day in which prominent keynote speakers will be invited to address significant areas of sustainable development such as natural resource management, peace and sustainable development, environment, and gender. The plenary each day will be followed by two to three concurrent sessions / panels on sub-themes covered under the overarching theme. The plenary will last for one hour and 30 minutes while the duration of each panel will be two hours and 30 minutes with three to five presentations.

Both inaugural and concluding sessions would be graced by members of federal cabinet and distinguished lectures by eminent scholars on Peace and Sustainable Development in South Asia: The Way Forward.C

Conference Website

SDC 2010 Panels

Shared below is a list of panels being organized, which are subject to change depending upon the response from potential speakers. Click on the panel title to read the sub-theme of the panel.

  1. Advancing Sound Chemical Management for Sustainable Development and a Toxic Free Asia
  2. Responding to Climate Change in South Asia
  3. Climate Change, a Security Risk? The Case of South Asia
  4. Revisiting the Indus Water Treaty for Peace and Sustainable Development
  5. The Water and Sanitation Challenge in South Asia
  6. Poverty Reduction: Social Exclusion and Safety Nets in South Asia
  7. Federalism: A Challenge to Conflict Management in Less Developed Countries/South Asia
  8. Peace through Development?
  9. Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD): Impacts on South Asia
  10. Floods and Disaster Preparedness in Pakistan: Regional Solution to National Problems
  11. Peace and Sustainable Development: The Role of Think Tanks (Brainstorming Session)
  12. Imagine a New South Asia: 25 Years of SAARC
  13. The Relationship between Food Insecurity, Poverty, Militancy and Conflict
  14. Sustainable Development and Peace: Respecting Religious Diversity
  15. Regional Trade: The Way Forward
  16. Neo-liberalising South Asia—Impacts of Structural Adjustment: IMF and World Bank Programmes
  17. Ending Violence Against Women (VAW): The Unconventional Role of Men
  18. Energy Governance in South Asia
  19. Post-Flood Impact on the Worst Forms of Child Labour and the Role of the Media
  20. Panel by UNDP’s Strengthening Democracy through Participatory Development (SDPD)

Abstracts

  1. Advancing Sound Chemical Management for Sustainable Development and a Toxic Free Asia
  2. Responding to Climate Change in South Asia
  3. Climate Change, a Security Risk? The Case of South Asia
  4. Revisiting the Indus Water Treaty for Peace and Sustainable Development
  5. The Water and Sanitation Challenge in South Asia
  6. Poverty Reduction: Social Exclusion and Safety Nets in South Asia
  7. Federalism: A Challenge to Conflict Management in Less Developed Countries/South Asia
  8. Peace through Development?
  9. Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD): Impacts on South Asia
  10. Floods and Disaster Preparedness in Pakistan: Regional Solution to National Problems
  11. Peace and Sustainable Development: The Role of Think Tanks (Brainstorming Session)
  12. Imagine a New South Asia: 25 Years of SAARC
  13. The Relationship between Food Insecurity, Poverty, Militancy and Conflict
  14. Sustainable Development and Peace: Respecting Religious Diversity
  15. Regional Trade: The Way Forward
  16. Neo-liberalising South Asia—Impacts of Structural Adjustment: IMF and World Bank Programmes
  17. Ending Violence Against Women (VAW): The Unconventional Role of Men
  18. Energy Governance in South Asia
  19. Post-Flood Impact on the Worst Forms of Child Labour and the Role of the Media
  20. Panel by UNDP’s Strengthening Democracy through Participatory Development (SDPD)

Program/ Panel Sessions

SDPI’s Thirteenth Sustainable Development Conference:
21—23 December 2010
Peace and Sustainable Development in South Asia:
The Way Forward
(Updated: 9 December 2010)
Tuesday, 21 December 2010
9:00 – 11:00 11:30 – 1:30 2:30 –4:30
Concurrent Session A-1
Sustainable Development and
Peace: Respecting Religious
Diversity
1. Dr. Masood Raja, USA
2. Ms Ayesha Salman, Pakistan
3. Mr. Ahmad Salim, Pakistan
4. Ms Urvashi Butalia, India
5. Ms Humaira Ashfaq, Pakistan
6. Ms Shelina Thawer
(commentator), UK
Concurrent Session A-5
Peace and Sustainable
Development: The Role of Think
Tanks (Brainstorming Session-by
invitation only)
Moderator: Dr. Adil Najam (to be
confirmed), USA
Concurrent Session A-2
Advancing Sound Chemical
Management for Sustainable
Development and a Toxic Free
Asia – Session I
1. Dr. Mahmood A. Khwaja,
Pakistan
2. Mr. Ram Charitra Sah, Nepal
3. Prof. Ms Kalkash Abubakirova,
Kazhastan
Concurrent Session A-6
Advancing Sound Chemical
Management for Sustainable
Development and a Toxic Free
Asia – Session II
1. Ms Anjum Rasheed, Pakistan
2. Ms Asma Younas, Pakistan
3. Ms Fouzia Minhas, Pakistan
4. Mr. Khuda Baksh, Pakistan
Introduction:
Dr. Abid Q. Suleri, Executive
Director, SDPI, Islamabad,
Pakistan
Welcome Address:
Dr. Saeed Shafqat, Chairperson,
Board of Directors, SDPI,
Islamabad, Pakistan
Remarks by the Chief Guest
Book Launch:
Fostering Sustainable
Development in South Asia:
Responding to Challenges
Keynote Speaker:
Ms Urvashi Butalia,
Director,
Zubaan Books,
India
Plenary Title:
Confronting the Past: Imagining
the Future
Is there Hope for a New South
Asia?
Discussion
Concurrent Session A-3
Floods and Disaster Preparedness
in Pakistan: Regional Solution to
National Problems
1. Dr. Edward Gonzalez, Pakistan
2. Ms Huda Sarfraz, Pakistan
3. Mr. Sanaullah Rustamani,
Pakistan
4. Mr. Arshad Abbasi & Ms
Javeria Hasan, Pakistan
Concurrent Session A-7
Climate Change, a Security Risk?
The Case of South Asia
1. Dr. Robina Bhatti, USA
2. Dr. Aneel Salman, Pakistan
3. Mr. Kiran Maharjan, Nepal
Concurrent Session A-4
The Water and Sanitation
Challenge in South Asia
Session I:
1. Mr. Ahmed Nawaz Hakro,
Oman
2. Mr. Munawar Hasan, Pakistan
3. Mr. Dibalok Singha, Dhaka
Concurrent Session A-8
Federalism: A Challenge to
Conflict Management in Less
Developed Countries/South Asia
1. Mr. Arshad Khan, Islamabad
2. Dr. Yunas Samad, UK
3. Dr. Bishnu Upreti, Nepal
Wednesday, 22 December 2010
9:00 – 11:00 11:30 – 1:30 2:30 –4:30
Concurrent Session B-1
Neo-liberalising South Asia—
Impacts of Structural Adjustment:
IMF and World Bank Programmes
1. Ms Faiqa Umer, Pakistan
2. Dr. Muzna Fatima, India
3. Ms Antonia Settle, Australia
Concurrent Session B-4
Peace through Development?
1. Dr. Lubna Chaudhry, USA
2. Dr. Anita Ghimire, Nepal
3. Mr. Shaukat Sharar, Pakistan
4. Mr. Raza Ahmad, Pakistan
5. Mr. Fahim Razaq, Pakistan
Concurrent Session B-7
The Water and Sanitation
Challenge in South Asia
Session II:
1. Mr. Badiul Alam, Bangladesh
2. Mr. Faisal Shaheen, Canada
3. Mr. Shamim Ahmed (tentative),
Bangladesh
4. Mr. Ashutosh Tiwari
(tentative), Nepal
Concurrent Session B-2
Imagine a New South Asia: 25
years of SAARC
1. Dr. Abid Q. Suleri, Pakistan
2. Mr. Rashid Ahmad Khan,
Pakistan
3. Mr. Faisal Shaheen, Canada
4. Dr. Avanish Kumar, India
5. Mr. Tahir M. Azad, Pakistan
Concurrent Session B-5
Poverty Reduction: Social
Exclusion and Safety Nets in
South Asia
1. Dr. Azra Razzack, India
2. Dr. Prakash Tiwari, India
3. Mr. Faisal Shaheen, Canada
4. Ms Priyanthi Farnando, Sri
Lanka
5. Dr. Babar Shahbaz, Pakistan
Concurrent Session B-8
Revisiting the Indus Water Treaty
for Peace and Sustainable
Development
1. Dr. Shaheen Akhtar, Pakistan
2. Mr. Arshad Abbasi, Pakistan
3. Mr. Shakeel Ramay, Pakistan
Concurrent Session B-3
Responding to Climate Change in
South Asia
1. Mr. Waqas bin Najib, Pakistan
2. Ms Anusha Sherazi, Pakistan
3. Ms Javeriya Hasan, Pakistan
Concurrent Session B-6
Ending Violence Against Women:
The Unconventional Role of Men
1. Ms Mome Salim, Pakistan
2. Ms Sameena Nazir, Pakistan
3. Ms Arifa Mazhar, Pakistan
Concurrent Session B-9
Regional Trade: The Way Forward
1. Mr. Faisal Shaheen, Canada
2. Dr. Khondaker Golam
Moazzem, Bangladesh
3. Speaker from SAWTEE, Nepal
Concurrent Panel B-6a
Financing Climate Change
1. Mr. Raman Mehta, India
2. Mr. Shafqat Kakakhel,
Pakistan
3. Mr. Sanjay Vashisht, Pakistan
4. Mr. Shakeel Ramay, Pakistan
Thursday, 23 December 2010
9:00 – 11:00 11:30 – 1:30 2:30 –4:30
Concurrent Session C-1
Post-Flood Impact on the Worst
Forms of Child Labour and the
Role of the Media
1. Dr. Saba Khattak, Pakistan
2. Mr. Khalid Jamil, Pakistan
3. Mr. Shahbaz Bokhari, Pakistan
Concurrent Session C-4
Reducing Emissions from
Deforestation and Degradation
(REDD): Impacts on South Asia
1. Mr. Nasir Mehmood and
Chaudhry Javed, Pakistan
2. Mr. Nadeem Bokhari and Mr.
Nasir Mehmood, Pakistan
Concurrent Session C-2
Energy Governance in South Asia
1. Mr. Arshad Abbasi, Pakistan
2. Ms Javeria Hasan, Pakistan
Concurrent Session C-5
The Relationship between Food
Insecurity, Poverty, Militancy and
Conflict
1. Dr. Abid Q. Suleri, Pakistan
2. Dr. Bishnu Upreti, Nepal
3. Dr. Ayesha Siddiqa, Pakistan
4. Mr. Matthew J. D. Robinson,
India
Concurrent Session C-3
Role of Parliamentarians in Peace
and Sustainable Development
Panel by the
Strengthening Democracy through
Parliamentary Development
(SDPD)
Concurrent Session C-6
Water Resource Management:
Sharing Perspectives
1. Mr. Shakeel Ramay,
Pakistan
2. Mr. Arshad Abbasi,
Pakistan
3. Mr. Imran Shoukat,
Pakistan
4. US Embassy
Representative
H. U. Beg Memorial Lecture
Keynote Speaker:
Dr. Tariq Banuri
Director, Division for Sustainable
Development
Department of Economic and
Social Affairs (DESA)
United Nations, New York, USA
Remarks by the Chief Guest
Vote of Thanks:
Dr. Abid Q. Suleri, Executive
Director, SDPI, Islamabad,
Pakistan